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“What is that annoying ringing in my ear(s)?!” or “Oh! I lost the hearing in my ear(s) again!” Chances are, if you have said either of these common phrases, you probably have a hearing loss of some kind.  In fact, medical research in the past few years has shown that people who have tinnitus also have some form of hearing loss.

Hearing loss has many differing causes and severities.  Some people living with hearing loss experience a small or narrow band of sound frequencies as the result of a minor injury to the inner ear. In these cases, the injury may not result in hearing loss, aside from the Tinnitus or ringing ears experienced. However, for the majority of Tinnitus cases, hearing loss is the underlying issue.


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November 21, 2018 Uncategorized0

With the holidays quickly approaching, many of us will be hosting and/or attending holiday dinners, holiday parties and other holiday events with friends, family and loved ones. In the middle of all this holiday cheer and celebration, it can be easy to forget about the challenges those people with hearing loss face.  Parties and celebrations are a staple of the holiday season, but for people with hearing loss, Christmas music, conversations, and social interaction can be challenging, if not totally frustrating.


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Most people have utilized their hearing for so long it has become second nature and not something many of us focus on daily. Especially today, many of us do pay attention to our health by getting annual physicals, trying to stay active and working on eating a healthy diet. Through all these efforts, hearing health and hearing loss tends to fall to the side of our overall attention to health.

Of course, back in the old days, many of us will remember raising our hands for the beep, wearing headphones getting our hearing tested as children. We may even remember brief hearing health screenings at annual physicals as we aged. But all too often, as we reach adulthood, many of us think we hear “just fine”, which can be so misleading.


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Just like so many things in our society today, not everything is as it appears. Falling in line with this thinking, hearing loss too is not only about hearing. No, it’s not a riddle or a deep thought joke. The fact of the matter is, hearing loss impacts a person in more ways than you can imagine. Hearing loss is not only about turning up the volume on the TV, or asking people around you to repeat conversations. Today, hearing loss research is showing us that hearing loss is connected to our overall health and well-being in many ways you may not have considered.


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June 27, 2018 Hearing Loss0

I’ve never heard anyone ever say, “I can’t wait to have hearing loss!” No, it’s not exciting. No, it doesn’t make us feel young. But, ignoring it could be the worst mistake you ever make. The fact is, we actually hear with our brains. If you missed it, check out our blog, Hearing Loss: What it is and What Happens When You Learn You Have it? Yup, hearing actually happens in the brain and our ears function more like funnels for sound.


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June 20, 2018 Hearing Loss0

One of the most important abilities we have as humans is our ability to communicate. This includes hearing, talking, seeing, smelling and touching. When we’re young, we certainly tend to take these abilities for granted. However, as we grow older, our abilities to communicate as well as we used to can change. When we notice these abilities begin to change, that’s when it’s time to take action.


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June 14, 2018 Hearing Loss0

We used to believe hearing loss was a normal part of the aging process. Today we know hearing actually happens in the brain and our ears function more like funnels for sound. So, in simple and understandable terms, sounds around us are detected by our outer ear, the funnel.  Sound waves then travel from the outer ear, through to the middle ear. The ear drum then takes these sounds waves, amplifies them and turns them into vibrations. As the trickle effect continues, the vibrations travel to the inner ear. Within the inner ear there are tiny inner ear hair cells. These cells translate the vibrations into neural signals, which are then sent to the brain. The brain then interprets the neural signals it recognizes and we understand what we are hearing.


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