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“Tinnitus itself is defined as a “ringing” or “buzzing” sound in the ears, according to the CDC (Center for Disease Control), “Some 30 million Americans have tinnitus and approximately 13 million Americans report tinnitus without hearing loss.

Tinnitus is a condition that has proven to be moderately to severely difficult to live with.  People do tend to downplay the severity of their tinnitus and consider it a mild inconvenience.


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Acknowledging your hearing loss is the first step toward a healthier you. As a new hearing aid user, you probably know that hearing loss impacts more than just your hearing abilities. Because we hear with our brains, cognitive decline is common in those who have ignored hearing loss treatment. Untreated hearing loss has also been linked to hypertension and stress, anxiety attacks, headaches, gastrointestinal problems and more.


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For people living with untreated hearing loss, it can already feel isolating in ‘regular’ daily life without the addition of social isolation. This is especially true for people aged 65+ who have retired and are living with moderate to severe untreated hearing loss.


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Tinnitus is a ringing or buzzing sound some people experience in their ears. Tinnitus severity can come and go and last for different amounts of time. People sometimes experience tinnitus when they are living with a high frequency hearing loss. Tinnitus can usually be managed with an appropriate hearing aid.


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This is the season for the flu, common colds and yes, even an ear infection! From your neighbors and friends to your work colleagues, it seems everyone is sick with something this season! Here you will find out more about the signs and symptoms of ear infections so you can be more proactive about your hearing healthcare.


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It’s finally 2020, which is not only a new year, but a new decade! If you’re like most people across the globe, you probably had some version of a new year’s resolution. If you made a commitment to get healthy in the new year, consider including your hearing health within that resolution. Of course, resolutions only work when we are emotionally invested and committed to them.

For you to be healthy this year, your hearing health should absolutely be a part of your overall plan. Why? Well, aside from your hearing health being one of your primary five senses, your hearing health is very much connected to your long-term brain health as well.


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Did you know you have a set of sensory hair cells in your inner ear that are responsible for how you hear? The hair cells (Also known as stereocilia) in the inner ear receive sound vibrations from these hair cells, which are rolled up and live inside the cochlea. Unlike the hair on your head, these hair cells do not grow back once they are damaged or die. What many of us don’t realize is that there is a great deal of things that happen that can permanently damage these hair cells, which are actually very delicate.


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From loud noises to an infection and the aging process, many of us will experience hearing loss at some point in our lives. Today, nearly 50 million Americans experience some level of hearing loss. An additional 20 percent of Americans experience Tinnitus, which is a ringing or buzzing the ears. 90 percent of Tinnitus cases are connected to a form of hearing loss.

So, how exactly does hearing loss happen? Hearing loss is the result of damage to the hairs or nerve cells in the cochlea that send sound signals to the brain. There are four distinct types of hearing loss: Conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, Mixed hearing loss (sensorineural and conductive) and neural hearing loss.  


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